Personal Stories of America at Work

How a Married Couple Makes Hospitality Their Full-Time Business

Cindy Reinhart makes a dream job work on the California Coast

"Running a B&B is hard work, but we can mold it around our lives."

My husband, Charles, and I recently celebrated running our own bed and breakfast, the Joshua Grindle Inn, in Mendocino, California, for just over 10 years.

Running a B&B is hard work. The average tenure of an innkeeper tends to be about five years. After five years they burn out and move on because they hadn’t realized that it is very hard work. We are a little different because we didn’t flee other careers like most people.  

Read the full interview >>

TWC_site_homeblog_072810_r4 Sandy Jones-Kaminski | March 08, 2012 | Entrepreneurs, Hospitality, Small business, Women, Working Mother | 3

How Two Ambitious Women Make Job Sharing—and Life—Work

Alix Apfelberg and Sharon Blender share talent and technology to succeed in fast-paced Silicon Valley

“The nature of the jobs we take and design result in really complex roles. And what we bring to those jobs is more than what one person alone could bring.”

I was working like crazy. I had no time.

Before we decided to job share at a Fortune 100 technology company, Sharon and I worked together almost every day for two-and-a-half years. Sharon had come from a computer hardware company, where she had job shared for four years. I was feeling very burned out in my finance position and ready to work on something new. We happened to be carpooling to a women’s leadership conference, and Sharon was talking to another person in the car about her old job share partner. I was all ears! “What’s a job share? I’ve never heard of that before.”

Read the full interview >>

thumb_mollyrosen2 Molly Rosen | August 16, 2011 | Automation, Finance, Women, Working Mother | 1

How One Woman Built a Career Creating Community at Work

Rebecca Brian helps shape the future of the workplace

“I started to find working from home to be insanely isolating and lonely . . . My reality was twelve hours a day of Ally McBeal reruns.”

The happiness formula

I’ve always been a community builder. Though for eight years, I didn’t know it and would have just called myself friendly.

When I got out of college with a degree in graphic design and my internship didn’t pan out into the job I expected, I started a design firm called Tribecca Designs. I didn’t know what I was doing, but the work was exciting. I loved dealing directly with clients and thrived on all the responsibility and creative license, creating logos, branding, websites, and brochures. I was hooked! I talked about design and business and my new venture everywhere I went and was the cheapest designer in the country—or at least New York City—so the work came easily.

Read the full interview >>

| July 26, 2011 | Entrepreneurs, Leadership, Small business | 3

The Working Chronicles

  • The Working Chronicles captures an intimate look at work in 21st century America through candid interviews with people from all walks of life and all corners of the country.

    Read More...»

Latest News

  • Have a story about changing careers? We want to hear from you!
    For a short time we are accepting submissions from readers and will publish the top stories on our blog and possibly include in a book.
    We'll accept an autobiographical story or interview with someone else--check out the Submission Guidelines.

Related Links

Categories

Chronicle Archives